V8 Bike Riders Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any books or magazines that have V8 bikes in them? It seems that everything is about Harleys or rice burners. I would like to see some specs on different swingarms, transmissions and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Ravinsomniac said:
Are there any books or magazines that have V8 bikes in them? It seems that everything is about Harleys or rice burners. I would like to see some specs on different swingarms, transmissions and such.
Rav,
subscribe the "Boss Hoss Country" magazine. I get it since 1999,
and I like it very much.
Here is a link to the mag:
http://www.bosshosscountry.com/magazine/bhc.html

Loaf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Uuups, I forgot you are a Kannon owner - no Boss Hoss. Sorry.
Therefore the Boss Hoss Country mag wouldn't be too interesting for you.

Loaf
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Loaf, I am not against Hoss bikes or their owners. I almost bought a Hoss, but the $38 grand price was a little steep for me at the time. I realize there won't be any Kannon information because they didn't make that many bikes. I'll definitely check out the Boss Hoss Country Magazine. Thanks. And I see that Lamont is a man of few words...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mr. Manson (nice photo) Lamont made a comment about other forum sites. I have to use Yaho* for the other forum for the kit car I have. It is a pain in the ass with all the pop-ups. Alot of guys in this forum use 350 or 427 Chevy's in their cars. Check it out if you like. I'm the kind of guy that wants to drive something different. http://www.mantacars.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
In this months edition of American Motorcyclist August 2005. It's the AMA magazine.
"THE ORIGIONAL ROCK STAR"
Like many of you, I like to consider myself an experienced motorcyclist. I've been lucky enough to ride some pretty impressive bikes in a variety of location over the years.
But as I contemplate swinging a leg over the 5700cc (350) Boss Hoss, I admit I'm a little apprehensive.
After all, when you shoehorn a 355 hp small block Chevy V8 into a motorcycle weights more than 1,000 lbs, you have to realize that the result might be alittle....................different.
Not that I don't like the idea of wretched excess that the Boss embodies. After all, long before the likes of Jesse James and the Teutuls were bring outrageous choppers to the mainstream TV the guys at Boss Hoss were building a bike that still gets more looks attention and stares than the customs that liter the road.
But even more than the customs that liter the roads & shows of today,the Boss Hoss-- the origional rock star - is a bike you MUST take in it's own terms.
It's a point driven home as I settle into the wide seat, with my legs splayed to clear more motor than in every motorcycle I've ever owned - combined.
As I heft the Hoss off its sidestand, though I'm surprised at how light it feels. Sure, it requires more of a tug than other bikes, but a low center of gravity keeps the Hoss from feeling like a half-ton machine.
I braced myself and push the starter button. Eight pistons move, air is inhaled through the 4 barrel carb, 8 spark plugs fire and there's a sideways tug as the entire bike rotates around it's massive crank-shaft. I blip the throttle and get used to the feeling, take a hard shallow, and head out on the road.
The Hoss comes with a 2-speed semi-automatic transmission, so once you clunk the bike into gear, riding is simple :twist to go, brake to stop.
At speed the wide handlebars offer enough leverage to provide surprisingly light touch. The 130 front and the 230 rear are tires you might find on a custom cruiser, so the bike leans readily in a narrow range until your heels touch asphalt.
Shifting into 2nd is unnecessary intil you reach about 80MPH, sp the Hoss feels and rides like the worlds biggest scooter. After a few miles, I'm not intimated at all.
Then I meet up with our photographer, and all that confidence goes away.
In this business a photo shoot means U turns. Lots of em. And when you've got 1,000 lbs riding an 80 inch wheelbase U-turns are exactly what you like to avoid.
Lucky, I find some wide, paved turnouts where I make many ungainly, 3 point, duck-walk, turns. A 1/2 hour of this is enough to convince me that I may never get comfortable witht he Hoss in a parking lot. And even though my time with the bike is limited. I find that it is surprisingly more managable that the spec sheet would suggest, And at a base proce of $34,500 for the SB, you get an awful lot of "Look at me" in a market where custom bikes can cost much more.
No, I wouldn;t want a Boss Hoss as an in-town commuter, but I do find myselft attracted to the notion of riding one across the Great Plains or through the sprawling Southwest. I might even go for the BB 502.
Author Grant Parsons
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
The Boss is a heavy bike, agreed. Intimidating, depends on your experience and attitude, mainly experience. My first experience on a Boss was when I picked mine up in Ohio. It was raining and I took a 10 minute test drive to get 'used' to it. After that, I packed the wife on the back and we headed down the interstate to Tennesee. No problems. I strongly disagree with the notion that it's tough in the parking lot. I only test rode it to get used to the throttle reponse mostly. Balancing a bike is the same no matter what.

Now that I'm used to it I'm comfortable anywhere. If it's moving, it's easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,728 Posts
Nice Pic of Red Boss in the American Motorcyclist article

Yep,

Nice Pic too. I copied it and stuck it on my Boss Hoss Tribute wall in my garage.

I subscribe to around 15 magazines including the BHRA and I save all articles on Boss Hoss. I chuckle when I see Boss Hoss in Cycleworld, now the AMA mag, Rider et al.

Except for the Barnett Magazine article on the 2002 502, all of them eccept Boss Hoss Country obviously seem to be forced to write off the Boss Hoss as "impractical", although they marvel at the advances in the build and quality.

Wonder how long we would have to wait until a Boss becomes MOTY (Motorcycle of the Year) like the Valkyrie once was.

I guess that's up to us as ambassadors to convince the journalists to own one. Most of them are too poor etc...as they're always complaining about the cost.

Keep the rubber side spinnin
Aldo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
I think it's just a matter of time before Discovery Channel or someone
produces a special just about V-8 motorcycles, and I'am sure Jay Leno will
be included.

Between OCC, Jessie James and Milwaukee Iron, I think they have just
about over-dosed everyone on V-Twins.

I also wouldn't be surprised if we see more manufacters of V-8 cycles
in the future, if the motorcycle bubble doesn't burst, gas prices don't
get way out of site, and most important, if the future ''fart pipes'' on their
Honda's generations takes an interest in V-8's, it might happen?

Time will tell :lol:

Geezer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,408 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
One thing you have to remember is, that V8 bikes are hybrids. A car engine squeezed into a bike frame. When motorcycle manufacturers propose to build a bike, they do it from the ground up. The weight, balance and aerodynamics are tested and retested by many factory riders. I have not ridden a new Honda 1800 yet, but I'll bet it could hold it's own against a Boss in a straight line, and out corner it too. The only thing we have is the "shock factor" of having something so outrageous. I love it ! :twisted:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
nope, wrong. And corners don't matter to me so I didn't try that. Well, corners matter, but on an average highway around here on the prairies, they aren't an issue.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top