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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I always feel I need to preface my opinions with the disclaimer that I am not a mechanic. I enjoy mechanical things and I read a lot.

So, the following procedure was created by me. I have used it on a number of Trikes with excellent results. I make no other claims for the correctness of the procedure.

Boss Hoss Trike Alignment

There are three steps required to get the Boss Hoss Trike wheels properly aligned. If your Trike is performing without any problems other than a “pulling” to the right or to the left as you ride down the road, you might consider skipping STEP 1 and STEP 2. STEP 3 is the actual “wheel alignment” procedure similar to the one performed when you take your automobile in for a wheel alignment. STEP 1 AND STEP 2 are chassis alignment procedures that should only need to be done in major assembly / reassembly situations.

STEP 1 – Transmission Height Adjustment.

The first step is to align the rear of the Turbo 350 transmission so it is in the same horizontal plane as the Heim joints that connect the rear axle. This step is performed during assembly of the Trike and should not have to be redone unless something has changed or you just want to check it to be sure it is right. If you are not going to perform this step, go to STEP 2.

Special tools / parts are required to do this. You need a yoke that matches the splined shaft on the Turbo 350 transmission and that uses either 3/4” U-joint cups or, if the cup holes are 1-1/8”in diameter, you need a bushing with a 1-1/8” OD and a ¾” ID. You also need a ¾” outside diameter rod long enough to reach from one side of the Trike to the other through the Heim joints. This rod must pass with no interference through both Heim joints and the yoke (inserted in the rear of the transmission). The only adjustment we are concerned with in this step is to get the transmission on the same horizontal plane as the Heim joints. There is a mount under the transmission that has a nut under the frame and a nut on top of the frame and, therefore, can be adjusted to set the height of the rear of the transmission. The Heim joints can be adjusted in or out to get the rod to pass from side to side as you are adjusting the height of the transmission. Remember, the only adjustment you are concerned with here is to ensure the horizontal centerline of the universal joint (yoke) is the same as the horizontal centerline of the Heim joints.


STEP 2 – Rear Axle Center Adjustment.

This step involves “centering” the rear axle assembly in the Trike.

Before we begin the centering procedure, be aware that the rear axle assembly must have horizontal, U-joint centerline alignment. This alignment employs the same concept used for the heim joints and the rear of the transmission. The rear axle, horizontal centerline alignment is performed during assembly (welding) of the rear axle ladder bars to the differential and no adjustments are provided. If you want to verify alignment, the U-joint cups must be removed from the yoke that is bolted to the front of the differential. The ¾” rod and bushings used in STEP 1 are used to check alignment and should pass without interference through the two ladder bars and the yoke on the front of the differential. If this alignment does not check out, machine work / welding is required to correct.

To continue with STEP 2 and to center the rear axle assembly, unbolt the lower shock mounts (three) so the rear axle is free to move with no encumbrance. The universal joint including the transmission yoke should be fully assembled. With the Trike frame supported by jack stands, roll the rear axle forward and insert the yoke into the rear of the transmission. Be sure the yoke slides in and out on the transmission output shaft with no interference or drag. Washers and shims should then be selected for each side to take up the space between the ladder bar and the Heim joint. This sets and “locks in” the side to side alignment of the ladder bars (and the rear axle) between the Heim joints.


STEP 3.

The process detailed here checks and adjusts the rolling alignment of the wheels. In other words, this procedure allows you to set the rear axle so the rear tires are tracing the same path on the road as the front wheel.

I assembled my own tools for this process. Any of a number of approaches can be used to accomplish this goal. First, a tool is required that can be placed against the rear rim and that projects a laser beam forward. I used a board cut to the proper length that rests on the rim without touching the tire. I then wire tied a Laser, pen light to the board.


A laser level or other ready made device can also be used. The goal is to get a device that can be placed against the rim and that projects a laser beam forward. You can put this device on the side wall of the tire, but using the rim as the support is more reliable and repeatable than tire sidewalls that vary in conformity.

The second tool required is a measurement device/s that can be placed alongside the front wheel for the laser to project onto. I affixed yardsticks to a 2” X 4” that can be set on the floor alongside the front wheel.

You can either move the measurement device from one side of the front tire to the other or make two of them and place one on each side of the front wheel. The measurement device must be placed directly below the axle to minimize any variance caused by the front wheel not being turned perfectly straight ahead.

To perform the alignment, set the 2” X 4” with the yard stick attached alongside the front wheel. Place the laser device on the rear rim on the same side of the Trike and note where the laser dot falls on the front measurement device. Then go to the other side and do the same. Ideally, you would adjust the Heim joints in or out to get the same reading (measurement) on both sides of the front wheel. This would mean all three tires are rolling in the exact same forward path. However, since most of our roads have a crown with the road falling off to the right, the Trike tends to drift to the right. Therefore, I have found canting the rear axle to the right (set the laser measurement on the right of the front wheel ¼” more than the left measurement) causes the Trike to run straight with less effort.
 

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You got that right . If Neil wrote the Boss Hoss manual , most of our problems would be over . He earned the name Hossbuilder for a reason.
 

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I will say that this is no doubt the best thing I did to my Trike. Neil told me about this a few days after I got my Trike so I did it right away and believe me it works. I can go down the hwy at 70, take my hands off the bars and it will go as straight as a string.
When I was at Street Vibration in Reno I had a chance to talk to Rad about Neil's idea and how he did it. If I am not mistaking they are doing it as we are posting this. His ears went straight up when I told him that I would take my hands off of the bars at 70, his first words out his mouth was you can't do that, but I did, and he believes me or not but it do works.
This is where I got the idea to do the 2 wheeler and it works as good.

Adrian
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alignment

OK, OK you guys. Keep it up and I am going to post my next "book" on 502 cooling. My ego thanks you all or y'all as they say here in Redneck country.

So, when I get it done I'll post it in the hopes that some of it will help others.
 

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Thanks Neil for shareing your ideas . If everyone would do the same thing we could all benifit from their knowledge and experence .
 
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