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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wanted to say so far so good. I have ran my bike in just about every situation now with out any slipping or heat issues :D I think this is the best bang for the buck that you can do to your Boss. I'm going to be doing V-Mans before next riding season. If your thinking about it, go for it :twisted:

 

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Lamont,

Can't wait to try mine :lol: It's going to be a long winter waiting for the snow to dry up :evil: I think I'm more anxious to try the converter than the NOS.

Gald to hear it's working well for ya.

Tim
 

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Fellas, just be sure it's the right one. I know two guys who thought they had the high stall converter when in fact they didn't. They wanted a 3,500 (number 7) and ended up with a 2,800 (number 5). If it's a Dacco (Nesco) and isn't a #7, it ain't the high stall converter.

Elliot
 

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Lamont

Which one are you running?

Adrian
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Adrian said:
Lamont

Which one are you running?

Adrian
I'm running the #7 from Nesco ($250.00) one and it works great. :D The stall speed depends on the motor and how it is built (or not). Mine should be around 3500 rpm.
 

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I love this bike now :lol: but I'm really looking forward to the new converter :shock:

As soon as the temps start "up" Lamont - I'll be down!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
V-MAN said:
I love this bike now :lol: but I'm really looking forward to the new converter :shock:

As soon as the temps start "up" Lamont - I'll be down!
You rode my bike before and after right? Tell the boys here what a differance it made on my bike. :D
 

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Lamont, that's correct about the stall speed/motor. I suspect weight would also play a part but with the small differences in our bikes, not that much. Horsepower/torque makes BIG differences.

That #7 will have a stall speed somewhere around 3,500 on the average smallblock but high 4,000's on some of the bigblocks. For that reason, nobody with a bigblock or highly modified smallbock may want to consider the #7. The #5 may be a good in between although Gary thought it wasn't enough.

I might add that he saw almost no difference in tranny temp going from the stock converter to the #5. Marv is a great one for anyone to talk to on this subject as he has tested (including dyno and track) all the various combos and has been very generous with feedback.

E
 

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Lamont.....Do you have to wait for your Coverter to engage???...Seems a couple people are having that problem.
I've never had to wait on My #7 crank it up and away you go....
Can't say enough about the #7,even with my Big ass on mine it will light it up and has no slip at all when leaving a red light or anyother speed that I can tell. :lol:

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
BADGER Dave said:
Lamont.....Do you have to wait for your Coverter to engage???...Seems a couple people are having that problem.
I've never had to wait on My #7 crank it up and away you go....
Can't say enough about the #7,even with my Big ass on mine it will light it up and has no slip at all when leaving a red light or anyother speed that I can tell. :lol:

Dave
The coverter I had when I first got the bike hooked up pretty much right away. When Nesco replaced my tranny the new converter didn't hookup right away :( I called Jim and asked him about that and he said that the bike had to warm up first. This one takes off as soon as you put it in gear. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Elvis (Hemicide) said:
Lamont,
Do you have any idea what the stall speed was on your one speed.
Someone said around 1500 to 1600. If I was you Bro I would just replace that converter with the #7 to start with. Your going to love it.
 

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LaMonsterV8 said:
You rode my bike before and after right? Tell the boys here what a differance it made on my bike. :D
Never got the chance to ride your bike with the new converter BUT cruising around Daytona with you I could see the difference :)

It's almost embarassing that I can't lit that tire at 30 - 40 MPH :oops: All that power being wasted right now ...
 

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BADGER Dave said:
Hey Don.....Take 2 aspirin and put one #7 Converter in your Bike and then come see me in Daytona and we will "SMOKE" The tires together!!

Trust Me.... :p

Dave
Dave

1) I will definantly see you in March!
2) I will definantly be swapping out the converter w/Lamonts help (tranny guru) :D !

Need to wait for a little warmer weather before I order the converter. Probably won't have it in for Bikeweek :( but maybe a pit stop in TN on the way home :)

Did you ever contact Ego Tripp in regards to wheels? Sounds like the changes you have been making have all worked out for you ... :D awesome! Your bike is looking great, can't wait to see the ram air FI installed :wink:
 

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Converter replacement

Elliot, (or anyone else familiar with this procedure,)
Since you don't seem to mind writing, and have done this operation many times, I thought I'd ask if you'd give me a quick tutorial on changing the converter.
I plan on replacing the stock converter on my 2002/350. Aside from dealing with all the wiring, can the frame just be split (after removing the bolts that hold the frame together) and rolled back after removing the bolts that hold the bell housing to the engine? ( after supporting the engine, and using trailer jacks or whatever to support the back half) Or is there more to it? (which I'm sure there is!) I know I could stumble through it, but I thought it would be a good idea to see if I could get some instructions, and helpful hints from you, or anyone else that wouldn't mind shedding some light. Hope this isn't too much to ask. I've found it's always easier if I have the basic idea of what to expect before I actually start twirling wrenches. Thanks!!! :wink:
 

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Don,

Am I to infer from your remark about "don't seem to mind writing" that I'm longwinded? If so, you're right :? . The by-product of being in sales for years and semi-retired. Anyhow...

I'll give you a thumbnail version of some of the things you may find useful without going through each exact step. Most of it you've already hit.

I don't have access to a professional shop and as such, many of the means I use are backyard if you will. We've found that using a m/c type jack like a BlackJack or similar is a great device for putting under the back half of the bike. Really stabilizes it nicely. We use a floor jack to raise the bike and put jackstands underneath the framerails on the front section. Watch the brake lines and shift rod. A hydraulic floor jack will also work on the rear. Just make sure you have wheels.

After tank removal, wiring, brake lines (if you don't have the slack) and everything connecting front and rear, you remove the 4 upper and 4 lower frame rail bolts. You also have to take out the 3 bolts securing the torque converter to the flexplate. Open end/box wrench and a big screwdriver to turn the flexplate giving access to the next bolt. Make sure the alignment of the front and rear framerails are as equal as possible height wise to insure the rails will not bind. If you have an older model that's never been split, expect a real tug-o-war. Loosen the bellhousing bolts to the motor. I've found the best way to start splitting the two halves are to carefully wedge a large screwdriver or flat end of a prybar between the bellhousing and motor and pry slightly and equally on both sides. Once you do that a few times you'll notice the framerails have started to split and you can pull it apart. Lots easier with 4 hands than 2 on that part.

You can pull the rear section back and cant to one side giving access to the converter. Just pull and it's off. Slide the new one on and repeat the steps in reverse.

The good news with a converter replacement is it's a LOT easier than pulling the tranny. That involves totally seperating the two halves, disconnecting brakes, pulling the belt off, removing the front pulley, blah blah blah. It's also a job to twist the tranny clear of the frame and it's a heavy mutha.

I've skipped some of the obvious stuff but that's the essence of it. Good luck.

Elliot
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I might add that it is not necessary to remove or even loosen the rear wheel. The whole thing will roll back on the tire. I used a cherry picker to carry the weight from the top the last time I did it. It's takes me about 1.5 hours by myself to take it apart. Takes about three hours to get it back together. It's much better if you can get a helping hand.
 

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Tranny removal

Don,t you think it's a good idea for those of us that have not yet had to split our frames to periodically remove the frame connection bolts and try to lubricate the frame joints with penetrating oil ? Those joints have to pretty rusted on the older bikes. It's to bad they didn't use a stainless steel plug to connect the front of the frame to the rear . Seems like that would make it a lot easier to get apart.
 
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