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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I switched to a Centerforce II clutch. After screwing up the part numbers on the first order, I finally came up with the right parts. These have been installed and found to work well.

Centerforce II Clutch for the Boss Hoss

Clutch Disc: PN: 383271

Pressure plate: CF361874

Throwout Bearing: N1086 (also a Centerforce part).

If you desire to install the Centerforce III (dual friction), their tech support could give you the corresponding part numbers for that clutch. Also, if you don't have one, get an $8 GM 10-spline clutch alignment tool with your order because they don't come with the clutch kit.
 

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Hey Jim,

If I am not mistaken, the II and the III are priced closely together. I am curious as to why you put the II on rather than the III. I plan to make Centerforce my next clutch and at first planned to put the II on but after I decided to use the III. I haven't bought either one yet. What are your thoughts on this???


Hoss
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Centerforce II vs. III

Hey Hoss:

I don't have any expertise on clutches; before I installed mine, (along with the 383 stroker engine to replace my 210 HP mr. goodwrench 350) I had never even seen an automotive clutch and didn't know a pressure plate from a hot plate! I based that decision not on price, but on the advice of Bill Alexander, who told me that the Centerforce III, because of the harder, roughter clutch material, tends to be hard on the flywheels & pressure plates--causing them to wear quicker. He also said the CF II was adequate, (based on some of his friend's experiences) which definately seems to be the case. I think the CF III would be a good choice too.

Even though my CF II is not broken in, the engagement is much smoother than with the stock clutch. I like it a lot better.

Also, with Bill's help, I have been modifying my bike for the Ranger III phase one transmission that he is helping develop, which gives two speeds (with first being a 50% reduction). It will sit between the bell housing and the Curtis unit. I already have converted the belt drive to a dual chain drive to better handle the resulting increased loads on the final drive. I just ordered the transmission last week. Having a lower gear for first (and a higher one for cruising) will eliminate the need for slipping the clutch on take-off and slow speed turns. He is also developing a phase II which would eliminate the need for the curtis angle drive altogether, but I didn't want to wait. I will do the transmission install and the requisite frame modifications over the winter.
 

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Jim,
thanks for the part numbers. I needed those numbers for a 94' clutch BH
owner- a friend of mine. He, or anyone else can order the parts also at Summit. Summits part numbers and prices are:

CTF-383271 DISC $89.95
CTF-CF361874 CLUTCH KIT $116.69
CTF-N1086 Throwout Bearing 38-79 GM Cars/Trucks $47.99

I'll give him these numbers, so he can easily order them.

Thanks,
Loaf
 

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ceramic disc

Hello all,
I am currently upgrading my engine and since the bike is apart would like to replace the clutch. I was wondering if the Centerforce disc you guys are using is ceramic padded like the stock type that was in my bike. I'm assuming that a fiber disc would be likely smoke under really hard take-offs, feathering out the clutch, when trying not to spin the tire too much. The factory said they can get me a replacement, but on many items of our bikes, upgrades to better items is possible, especially since 96, and I want to take full advantage of that fact while its apart. Any input is greatly appreciated.
Kenny
 

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Hey Guys, I heard from Roger at Centerforce and he tells me the disc 383271, the correct one for our bikes is organic padded. I bet it will allow longer life to the pressure plate and flywheel, maybe wearing on them less than a ceramic, but I am curious if any one has had that clutch in for an extended period and can report on how its holding up. I would have thought the reason the factory went to a ceramic was because on a really hard launch were little tire spin was desired, and feathering out the clutch that a organic pads would smoke and smell burned. Only assuming here. I want to put in a new clutch while the bike is apart and want the best choice. Kenny
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The centerforce II clutch is organic material, but it uses centrifugal weights that work to decrease effort in operating the clutch, and fix it tight against flywheel/pressure plate. It feathers much better than the ceramic clutch, and after I get my two-speed manual translmission installed, I expect it will work well. This is a heavy duty clutch made and I also expect much longer life. We'll see The ceramic clutch was gone at 6500 miles.
 

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Well, just talked to Bill Alexander a long while on the phone and I'm convinced to try the Centerforce II and just ordered the parts listed above, however, at Summit the pressure plate part number for the stage II is CTF-CFT361874 instead of CTF-CF361874 which is the stage I pressure plate. Also if ordering from Summit and searching for the parts in the list you may not find them but can type in the part numbers in the "part number search blank" and they'll come up.
Kenny
 

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I got my bike together with the centerforce clutch installed and really like it. Is is really easy to pull and enguages extremely smoooooooth. I may also have the booster lined up better. I have discovered just how critical lining the booster rod up to the cable and pedal pivot bar (or "t-Bar I call it) really is. Getting the spacers on the booster mount bracket just right as well as the up and down angle as allowed by the slotted bolt holes on that bracket is important for good plunger seal which allows the booster to push with fullest potential. I check allignment with hand clutch lever pulled to the grip while assisting this pull with pedal if engine is not running. This is the point at which you want the truest allignment. Most of you "Clutch Hossers" have it figured out and may even have more to offer, but thought I'd list how I do it for those who haven't attempted it yet.
 
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