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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a 2000 Big Block with about 4000 miles on it. It has developed a slight but persistent leak so I jacked it up for a look. The back right side oil pan bolt behind the starter was pretty damp, which made sense: it only leaks after I've ridden it. All other pan bolts are dry and clean. I checked the torque on all the oil pan bolts including the suspect and they're fine.

Question/Problem: Does anybody know if the oil pan can be dropped without pulling the motor? I am doubtful with the frame crossmember, but I'm not anxious to split the bike again: had to do so to have my tranny rebuilt earlier this year.

Any ideas on how I might elimnate the leak? It's not a lot of oil but makes a recurring mess underneath the bike and blows back onto the tranny, etc.

Thanks for any feedback,
Tracy
 

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Tracy_Iverson said:
I've got a 2000 Big Block with about 4000 miles on it. It has developed a slight but persistent leak so I jacked it up for a look. The back right side oil pan bolt behind the starter was pretty damp, which made sense: it only leaks after I've ridden it. All other pan bolts are dry and clean. I checked the torque on all the oil pan bolts including the suspect and they're fine.

Question/Problem: Does anybody know if the oil pan can be dropped without pulling the motor? I am doubtful with the frame crossmember, but I'm not anxious to split the bike again: had to do so to have my tranny rebuilt earlier this year.

Any ideas on how I might elimnate the leak? It's not a lot of oil but makes a recurring mess underneath the bike and blows back onto the tranny, etc.

Thanks for any feedback,
Tracy

An oil leak is some times a bear to find. I have a proven way but takes a while so I will give it to you. First I clean the area off real good with some cleaner like carburetor spray or brake cleaner only on the areas that are suspect. This may sound hard but is easier than it sounds. I tape off the all the vent holes to the block and hook up a vacuum line (from my car, that I park out side behind the garage door) and hook it up to the PVC valve on my leaking engine. I use a air hose hooking it to the carburetor vacuum porton the running engine. Start the car and close the garage door so I don't hear the engine from the car and then listen to the areas that may be leaking. I have a mechanic ear scope that helps. When I find the leak I put silicone in the holes and no more leaks ever. I do have a vacuum pump for my air condition pump down so it is easier for me, but I did this way for a long time.

Adrian
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Boss Hoss Motorcycle, Not Car Question

Adrian,

Thanks for your message, but my question is regarding a Boss Hoss Big Block motorcycle...I think I know where the leak is coming from, I'm just trying to figure out what to do about it without having to disassemble the motorcycle.

Thanks,
Tracy
 

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Re: Boss Hoss Motorcycle, Not Car Question

Tracy_Iverson said:
Adrian,

Thanks for your message, but my question is regarding a Boss Hoss Big Block motorcycle...I think I know where the leak is coming from, I'm just trying to figure out what to do about it without having to disassemble the motorcycle.

Thanks,
Tracy
I think I know what a 502 is and if you do what I said it will work just great on a Big Block Chevrolet Motorcycle. When you locate the air being sucked into the crank case just squirt some silicone in the hole and it is fixed.
The pan will not come off of the Engine in the bike (without removing the engine) but you might be able to drop the pan down, but this method is much easier than pulling the pan off.

Adrian
 

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Tracy...before you start doing breakdowns, I need to tell you that I went crazy on my small block thinking the leak was in the same place as your's. If you think you know exactly where the leak is from...you are probably wrong.
Turned out it was mist from the tranny breather which would accumulate and move down to puddle under the bellhousing and rear of the engine. Fit a 3/8" to3/8" pipe thread hose fitting to the tranny vent. Run a hose up to a Harley type breather filter and install it onto the left rear carb bolt (need a 1/4" longer bolt). I'll bet it's the breather. Took me over a year to get it!
I saw no oil next to the breather so I thought the leak came from elsewhere..I was wrong.
Try what I'm saying...you may be pleasantly surprised...Joe
PS. Another pssibility is the rear of the intake manifold where it meets the heads..check it out also.
 

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Tracy....The fact that it only happens after riding reinforces my thoughts. The oil pan would be a very unlikely source of your leak because it should drip even if you haven't ridden, They very seldom leak...Joe
PS. Remember the wind blows the oil around and the source is, often, very hard to determine because wind and gravity pull the oil from the source of the leak to the lowest point.
 

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Oil Leak

Tracy

I have had four 502's. Two of them had leaks at the oil pressure sender pipe fittings (along side of the distributor). Take a good look at the top of the engine under the oil sender. If there is any oil you have found it. It runs down the bell housing and the oil pan and appears to be an oil pan or rear main seal leak.

The fix is easy. Simply replumb the oil sender with new sealant.
 

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Tracy,
if it's a leaking oil pan -try Adrians way to seal it! I had a leaking manifold when I bought my 99 ZZ4. I've read Adrians tip - and I hooked up a vacuum cleaner (the one I use for my garage has a 14 feet long hose) to the PCV side of the engine (don't forget to plug the breather side), and I could hear the leak very well- like Adrian said. I sprayed a little amount of break cleaner at the leak to degrease it, then I let the vacuum suck a small amount of fresh sealant in the leak. I shutted the vacuum cleaner off, let it harden for one night - and it's dry since that day.

Adrian - that was one of the most genius tricks I ever read, and I told it to a lot of my friends after I fixed the leak your way...

Loaf

PS: Neil's suggestion to have a close look at the oil pressure sender fitting is spending two minutes worth as well. My one was leaking, too...
 

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I have been in the same situation with respect to the pan gasket--and yes the frame does have to come apart the only difference is that mine was a 540 but a big block should be a big block. Curtis the owner of Texas Boss Hoss told me when this happened to my bike that it was indeed very rare for a pan gasket to leak but it does happen! Unfortunately, this will be a pain in the ass for your wallet! Easy fix on the small block but not the big block—the price we have to pay for running the big boy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks!!

Thanks to all for the feedback...Adrian, I will try your technique, I apologize for not understanding your first message to me...

I'll also check the oil sender plumbing, sounds like a lot of guys have had a problem there.

Thanks again, be safe!

Tracy
 

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Tracy,

Also be sure to check that transmission breather. It may not look wet, but on mine it was the culprit and once I plumbed it into a "catch can" my bike dried up totally.

On Wags small block, his turned out to be a very small leak in the intake gasket near the left rear corner of the intake. Very small leak that would only show up after being ridden.

Tim
 
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