2001 Boss Hoss ZZ4 350 Trike Parts List: Mindless Philosopher's Ride - Page 5
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Thread: 2001 Boss Hoss ZZ4 350 Trike Parts List: Mindless Philosopher's Ride

  1. #121
    Veteran Member The Mindless Philosopher's Avatar
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    Default Front Tire

    I bought a Bridgestone Spitfire S11 front tire, but I'm thinking I'll order a Metzler ME880 instead. Now that I have the Bridgestone and can make a side-by-side comparison, it just doesn't have enough contact patch for me. It's too rounded. I need more rubber on the road up front. The ME880 is flatter. Fortunately, the Bridgestone didn't cost a whole lot. I can get the Metzler for pretty close to the same price, too.

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  3. #122
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    Default Alternator Belt Change: Final Solution

    The Duralast belt proved insufficient. It popped the day I took the Hoss to the mechanic, two or three weeks ago. They installed a Gates Racing 9325HD V-Belt. This thing has been doing the job well for at least 160 miles now, at every speed and acceleration rate I've thrown at it.

    The belt rides high on the alternator pulley, above the top in fact. But it also rides deep in the valley. That, and it's thick. It firmly hugs the sides of the alternator and the crank pulleys.

    As it turns out, the Duralast sat deep in the pulleys, but it was too narrow. It would slip when it got too hot. This Gates belt fills everything in and hangs on. The alternator mounting brackets were completely removed and inspected. They are not cracked or flexing.

    So far it looks like I'll be sticking with the Gates 9325HD.



  4. #123
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    Default Doing More Research on Tires

    Quote Originally Posted by The Mindless Philosopher View Post
    I bought a Bridgestone Spitfire S11 front tire, but I'm thinking I'll order a Metzler ME880 instead. Now that I have the Bridgestone and can make a side-by-side comparison, it just doesn't have enough contact patch for me. It's too rounded. I need more rubber on the road up front. The ME880 is flatter. Fortunately, the Bridgestone didn't cost a whole lot. I can get the Metzler for pretty close to the same price, too.

    It turns out the Bridgestone I bought has a higher load rating (67H - 853 lbs. according to an online load chart/675 lbs. according to the manufacturer, maximum 41 PSI.) than the Metzler 880 (57H - 507 lbs. according to the online chart) that's already on the trike and is wearing out. Both have 130 MPH speed ratings.

    It looks like a bias tire (instead of a radial) would be the way to go in relation to braking characteristics.

    The more I dig, the more I'm thinking I might actually look for a rear Bridgestone tire to put on front, maybe something with the same load rating but a slightly higher speed rating. Hard to say. If nothing else, I'll probably just order a rear Bridgestone like the front one sitting in the garage. At least with a trike, I think I have a little more wiggle room than if I were on two wheels.

    As for customer reviews, bike bandit.com has the Bridgestone S11 rated 4.8 out of 5 stars with 174 reviews.
    Last edited by The Mindless Philosopher; 01-25-2016 at 08:32 PM.

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  6. #124
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    Default

    Nah. After more digging and then doing a side-by-side comparison in the garage, I'll stick with the S11 front tire I already bought and just keep a rear tire in mind for next time, if all goes well.

  7. #125
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    Default Turn Signal Replacement Lenses DOT DP99 SAE

    I don't know how similar the turn signal lenses are on the various Boss Hoss models, but I've found the Harley-Davidson Deuce Bullet DOT DP99 SAE turn signal lenses were a perfect fit on my 2001.
    Last edited by The Mindless Philosopher; 01-26-2016 at 03:47 PM.

  8. #126
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    Default Got Two Weeks Out of it This Time Around

    The welds on the repaired body tilt hinges broke. Apparently, there just isn't enough surface area for a decent repair, even with another piece of metal tacked on to provide reinforcement. The body's just too heavy. Gotta figure out something else.

  9. #127
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    Default When the Hinges Originally Broke

    These photo's are a few months old, from when the hinges originally broke.

    The split bottom halves were re-welded with a piece of flat metal to help reinforce them. They lasted a little while. They have broken again, though.

    I have not removed them since I discovered the problem last night, so I don't have any photo's since the latest break.

    As you can see, the repair job in the last pic wasn't the prettiest in the world, and it did last for a while, but I apparently need to do something different. If nothing else, I'll probably have to buy two flat pieces of steel, have them welded to the backs of the busted hinges, then drill holes for the bolts. Should have done that in the first place, I guess.

    Meanwhile, I've been trying to find some comparable hinges to replace them.
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  10. #128
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    Default Well Now... That was Unexpected!

    I just crawled under the trike to take a peak, and:

    The hinges are fine! The @#$% lock washers didn't do their jobs, so the mounting bolts worked their ways out of the body! The bolts are either in the street somewhere, or they've rolled under the tires or someplace else in the garage.

    Time for some red Lock-Tite and new washers, if I can ever find those bolts!

    glad nothing is busted! Easy fix!
    Last edited by The Mindless Philosopher; 02-07-2016 at 01:49 PM.

  11. #129
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    Red loctite has always scared me. Have you thought about maybe
    trying nylock nuts or castle nuts??? I've even seen nuts that are
    pinched in on the top, but I don't know what they're called.

    Paul H
    WELLLLLLLLLL La De Da



  12. #130
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    Default Back in Business

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Red loctite has always scared me. Have you thought about maybe
    trying nylock nuts or castle nuts??? I've even seen nuts that are
    pinched in on the top, but I don't know what they're called.

    Paul H
    New bolts and new lock washers installed. Used a tiny bit of Loc-Tite. Just a little dab'll do ya. The body tilt kit is happy again.

  13. #131
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    Default Third Brake Light: Need to Re-Wire

    I bought some primary wire so I can re-wire my third brake light. It's been wired into the permanent running lights since the day I bought the trike.

    I Already have a large row of rear LED running lights in the ends of each fin of the '57 kit, so all this third light (below the license plate) ever does is confuse people since it's always lit. The two main taillights are dimmer than the third light. Because of the angle of the camera, it looks like the main light on one side is brighter than the other, but it isn't. This photo was taken without the brakes applied. When they are on, the lights on the outer edges brighten to the same intensity as the light in the middle.

    I haven't made up my mind whether this is necessarily a bad thing, but I'd guess it distracts their attention away from the main tail lights when I really do apply the brakes. No truly close calls yet, but I have seen some odd activity in my mirrors from time to time.
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    Last edited by The Mindless Philosopher; 02-07-2016 at 05:39 PM.

  14. #132
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    Default Third Brake Light Wired Correctly Now

    My tail lights are a 3-wire combo:
    - Red
    - Back
    - Blue

    My third brake light was a two-wire combo:
    - Red
    - Red/Black

    It took a little fishing around, but I finally found the right combination to meet my needs:

    - Red/black wire from the third brake light is now spliced into the black (ground) wire in the tail lights, and...
    - Red wire is spliced into the red wire on the tail lights.

    The red wire was the easy one to figure out.

    I originally tapped into the blue wire, but the third brake light stayed on all the time and wouldn't intensify when I applied the brakes, same as when it was wired into the license plate frame light.

    All's well now. No third light until I hit the brakes. (I verified it by tying the hand brake down with a shop rag.)
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    Last edited by The Mindless Philosopher; 02-07-2016 at 08:40 PM.

  15. #133
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    Default

    I think you should identify yourself as The Mindful Philosopher... it's an education reading your posts.

    Just saying...

  16. #134
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    I think you should identify yourself as The Mindful Philosopher... it's an education reading your posts.

    Just saying...
    Heh heh heh!

    Indeed, indeed!

  17. #135
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Red loctite has always scared me. Have you thought about maybe
    trying nylock nuts or castle nuts??? I've even seen nuts that are
    pinched in on the top, but I don't know what they're called.

    Paul H
    The only thing that keeps me from using nylock nuts is that I have no way to feed the bolts in from the opposite direction. I'm stuck with snugging bolt heads against lock washers.

    It's fixed now though. I'll save up some cash in case it goes squirrely again. Maybe do something different next time.

  18. #136
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    Default Foot Brake Pressure Sensor T-Fitting

    I have removed the Zip-Ties that were holding the foot brake pressure sensor T-fitting against the frame. Each time I applied the brakes, the pressure would cause the braided brake line to move. Eventually, it would cause the brake line collar to break its seal against the T-fitting and begin to drip and let air in. This happened no matter how snug the collar.

    Since I've removed the Zip-Ties, the T-fitting moves along with the braided foot brake line when pressure is applied, instead of remaining in place and resisting it. I don't know if this is an issue with anyone else's Hoss / other V8 bike or trike, but it was with mine. All better now.

    I still occasionally place a sheet of plain white printer paper under it, apply brake pressure a few times, and let it sit for a while to see if any drips form on the paper, just as a periodic safety check.
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  19. #137
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    Default Time for Front Brakes Again

    Barely 4,000 miles on the new brakes, and they're done. Grooves in the rotors. No visible heat spots or warps. I'll have to try a different kind of pad next time, I guess. Either way, it's time for pads and rotors. The ones I have are obviously not a good match for the Hoss.

  20. #138
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    Brent, Do you know what brakes you have on your trike???
    Whatever it is it's not BH. I think I seem remember that
    your trike has a 9" for rear. So you should be able to go
    with any number of stock or after market brake systems.

    Paul H
    WELLLLLLLLLL La De Da



  21. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Mindless Philosopher View Post
    Barely 4,000 miles on the new brakes, and they're done. Grooves in the rotors. No visible heat spots or warps. I'll have to try a different kind of pad next time, I guess. Either way, it's time for pads and rotors. The ones I have are obviously not a good match for the Hoss.

    My front brakes are a mix of Harley Davidson and Wilwood components. I don't know why they wore out so badly, so quickly. The calipers and pads are aligned properly, and seemed to fit well. The discs were as smooth as glass until this past week. Whatever happened, happened quickly.

    The rear brakes are still good. I'm contemplating going with rear discs some day, but for now all is well on the back end.
    Last edited by The Mindless Philosopher; 02-14-2016 at 09:25 AM.

  22. #140
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    Default Maybe a Little Hasty on the Brakes

    The more I dig around the internet, especially Harley-Davidson forums and other heavy cruiser bikes, the more it looks like grooves in the rotors are pretty normal and expected. Cars are a different story, apparently. Because of their weight, grooves in the rotors can be a lot more problematic.

    It seems grooves become an issue with bikes only when there are more serious signs of wear, such as:
    - Discolored spots on the rotors/burn marks
    - Warped rotors
    - Excessively deep grooves that chew up brake pads prematurely
    - Any physical defect that negatively affects braking

    Perhaps this is a bit over simplified. I'm not saying there isn't something that needs to be corrected, but for now, it's tough to pinpoint what that might be. I'm tired of just throwing money at it.

    So far the brakes are working just fine.

    Aside from squeaking now and then, there are clunking or rattling noises, or other tattle-tale signs that the calipers are having problems.

    Having experienced this beast with diminished braking capacity, and also with neither front nor rear braking capabilities (unintentional free-wheeling in light traffic), I know how negatively affected brakes feel. It's not fun relying upon engine torque and a sudden gear shift to come to a stop, with what's left of my hair standing up on my head, while puckering up so tight I could $#!& diamonds. I have none of that currently. Not even remotely close.

    What I will do is clean these up a little and keep inspecting and riding. I won't pull the trigger on new parts until I'm sure I have to, beginning with new pads. For now, I'll chalk up the rotor groove observation to new bike rider jitters over things I have no experience with. After all, I have less than 4 months and only 4,000 miles of actual riding time under my belt since December 2014. I just need to learn what's normal and what's not.

  23. #141
    Veteran Member HogV8's Avatar
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    The absolutly best front pads I have found for the Wilwood front calipers I Bought from Marv . I don't know the part number but I think they work great . i've tried other pads but have found these are the best .
    Jack ......2000 Boss Hoss 350/400 HP

    RIDE IT LIKE YOU KNOW HOW TO FIX IT

  24. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by HogV8 View Post
    The absolutly best front pads I have found for the Wilwood front calipers I Bought from Marv . I don't know the part number but I think they work great . i've tried other pads but have found these are the best .
    Is Marv a member here? A parts supplier?

  25. #143
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    Default Growing Seat Mounting Stud

    One of the two threaded studs on the underside (front) of my seat, that mount it to the fiberglass body, has begun to "grow" on its on. This can't be a good thing. Either it has detached from the seat, or perhaps the fiberglass has cracked. Could even be something else going on. Maybe a spacer slipped or something. I'll have to inspect later today.

  26. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Mindless Philosopher View Post
    Is Marv a member here? A parts supplier?
    Marv/ CHOPPER CITY / BOSS HOSS DEALER
    Jack ......2000 Boss Hoss 350/400 HP

    RIDE IT LIKE YOU KNOW HOW TO FIX IT

  27. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by HogV8 View Post
    Marv/ CHOPPER CITY / BOSS HOSS DEALER
    Excellent! Thank you.

  28. #146
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    Default Growing Seat Stud Mystery Solved (I Think)

    The best I've been able to figure out is that the seat had settled a little from me sitting on it, since I'd had it off the body a few times while I was making repairs between summer and winter 2015. I've racked up about 1,000 miles in the past 3 weeks since finally getting it back on the road. I ended up putting some extra spacers on the seat mounting studs to help keep things in place, and I swapped out the locking washers for newer, heavier duty pieces.

    I still do routine checks on various other nuts and bolts, because it's just in the nature of the Hoss to shake itself loose.

    And, so far my brakes are doing well. Glad I didn't push the panic button all the way by sinking more money into brake parts it turns out I don't need.

    Hoss is ready for more open road, out of town cruising.

  29. #147
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    Default Updated Original Post

    I've added a little info to the mile-long laundry list of items in my original post on this thread, specifically operational ranges I've observed via the gauges (the voltmeter is a little wonky), and updates to the fluids, and a few other odds-and-ends pieces-parts.

  30. #148
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    Default Rear Disc Brake Conversion Kit

    No immediate plans to convert to disc brakes. No money for it unless, of course, I come into some unexpected cash. Until then, it looks like a ballpark estimate for a good quality two wheel kit is in the neighborhood of $400-600.

    I've found several kits that appear to be pretty decent for less than $400. They are slotted but not drilled, with semi-metallic pads. They specify Chevy 10 and 12 bolt rear ends that use with 15" wheels on a 5 x 4.75" bolt pattern. Looks like several eBay sellers supply the same kit. Just a matter of looking for a seller with the best reputation when the day comes.

    Unless I'm mistaken, I need to look at the '64-72 Chevelle 11" non-staggered kits, or slightly smaller if there are any. One buyer did complain that a kit didn't fit with his 15" Chevy Rally wheels. I'm using Cragar S/S. I should probably still be cautious about rotor size, though.

    Sooner or later I'll have to crawl around and see if I can get any cast numbers off the axle housing, if there are any to be found.

    So...

    Instead of saving money for good quality brake shoes since I don't need them right now, I'll just start setting aside cash for the conversion. I'll buy new shoes if the need were to suddenly arise, but my sights are set on a hardware change.

    Let's see what the coming months bring...

  31. #149
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    Default Murphy's Law: Rear Brakes

    A few days after I start posting about rear brakes, and I wake to start my day and discover I have no pressure on them. This trike is haunted, I tell ya! Haunted! No worries. I'll do some monkeying tonight.

  32. #150
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    Default Rear Brake Band-Aid Fix

    I'm slowly losing fluid somewhere. The foot brake reservoir was nearly dry. Who knows? Needle in a haystack. If it's not dripping, but barely oozing somewhere, tackling the source becomes a challenge, especially the way daily road grime cakes up everywhere.

    The reservoir is full again, and pressure restored.

    Another day in the life.

    Recap of what I've replaced in the foot brake system (about a year ago, I think):
    - Peg (longer)
    - Master cylinder/reservoir components (I had to use two rebuild kits, because I couldn't find a kit that matched exactly)
    - Longer braided steel brake line (to stretch my legs a little and to move the master cylinder forward of the exhaust header)
    - New steel pressure switch T-fitting (the brass T-fitting split in half up top)
    - Brake fluid flush (DOT5)
    - Adjusted/expanded brake shoes (through access slot behind the drums)

    Not a complete overhaul, but enough to keep me in business.

    I can't wait until I can afford a disc brake swap. I can see fluid top-offs and line bleeding getting old after a while.

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